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Excerpt from Loves Lost







It's spring and love is in the air. In keeping with the spirit of the season, I wanted to share with you an excerpt of the story "Love Came Calling Again" from my book "Loves Lost".

I have always wanted to "feel" the love for someone, more than "being loved" and pampered.

I missed having someone in my life I would feel like cuddling with, on the couch in front of the TV with a tub of popcorn on a rainy evening, or someone I would just be happy buying things for, even if he didn’t need any of those. I missed being unreasonably possessive about someone. I wanted every romantic song I heard to throw up images of me in the arms of that special someone. I’ve always wanted someone to think of when it rained and the earth smelt sweet; I’ve always waited for a name I could whisper with my heart and soul, while clinging to my pillows under a warm blanket on a cold winter night. I spent my days and nights with that dream. And when I would meet him, there would be chimes in the air and a light drizzle, and an unruly breeze would play with my dupatta before his passionate gaze.

And then I met Karan. His father was a manager in one of the companies Dad owned in Kolkata and we met in one of Dad’s office parties I had reluctantly accompanied him to. I learnt later that Karan had been a reluctant guest as well.

The colour of my nails was fading; he had not bothered to shave and had a three-day old stubble. But, love caught us unawares as our eyes talked and our hearts made silent promises—with the live band playing out requests from drunken guests.

Karan worked in Mumbai and I was about to finish my studies in Kolkata. We soon realized that staying apart was not an option anymore. I found a job in Mumbai after university and moved in with him, setting up our home with love in our hearts and dreams in our eyes—leaving our conservative families shocked.

Within a year, the unexpected happened...

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