Skip to main content

Posts

Love Beyond Boundaries

Rajorshi Patranabis'  collection of poems "The Crossover: Love Beyond Eternity" published by Biva Publication is a collection of poems with a difference.

All the poems in this collection are about love that's eternal and immortal. They are about love that transcends borders of time, of life and of death. Rajorshi writes about love that cannot be confined within space and time, it flows unhindered and stays in the hearts and souls of lovers even as they cross over to other worlds, to other times.

In the poem "Happily Ever After" Rajorshi says:

Devoid of our bodies and just our souls Warrants never to hide in holes... We would flow in the wind and sun, Just you and me, in sorrow and fun...
The same idea finds voice in his poem "The Crossover" where thus laments a lover-
Your hands so easily, slipped over, With tears in my eyes, You managed to Crossover.
The lover goes on to spend his days and nights in the chasm of grief till -
A sudden slip in the…
Recent posts

How far down the abyss will you go?

Author Sabarna Roy's Abyss is a quick read in the format of a short 2-act play that manages to leave a lasting impact.

In the garb of a murder mystery, Abyss raises pertinent questions around the burning issue of land procurement for the purpose of industrialization. It takes a realistic look at the plight and the resulting compromises of authors in the modern ecosystem, where the quality of one's work is not enough to catapult one to heights of success and popularity. Most importantly, Abyss impressed me with its intriguing and realistic character sketches.

It leaves the reader with questions - how do we deal with indelible scars from the past? What prices do we pay for our ascent and how hard can we fall? How far down the abyss do our lust and our craving for power drive us?  When do relationships that we treasured till the other day, don't matter any more?

Kudos to the author Sabarna Roy! I look forward to reading his other books.

Cricket, Romance and Thrills make the right cocktail this summer!

Cricket is the only game I played in school. Over several years, this is the game that instilled in me discipline and perseverance. It taught me what it means to play with and for your team. It taught me what it means to compete fairly. Lessons that were to benefit me immensely in later years in my corporate life.
Cricket is also the only game that kept me glued to the television screen for hours. Growing up through the eighties and nineties, I watched my heroes on the field snatch unexpected victory from the jaws of imminent defeat, or, lose gracefully in the true spirit of the game, only to rise from the ashes in the next match. And my scrapbooks with their pictures kept piling up.
My interest was not limited only to their antics on the field. I wanted to know them as human beings and not just as larger-than-life heroes. This curiosity drew me to sports magazines and memoirs of cricketers, which, needless to say, I devoured with relish. I would also spend hours watching their intervie…

Book Review - One Indian Girl

With 'One Indian Girl', CB breaks new ground. He writes in the voice of a woman, he talks about the challenges the Indian society, the Great Indian Family, the workplace keep throwing at modern urban Indian women, and how the protagonist battles against all of this and also, "her own inner voice at times". The last is a very clever and in this context, very successful writing ploy. CB maintains an almost parallel thread where the inner voice of the girl, brought up in a conservative, archaic environment seeped in ridiculous traditions, is often in conflict with the decisions her learned, logical and rational mind takes. In some sections of the book, I see CB taking a VERY mature and evolved tone of writing - in sharp contrast to some of his earlier books. The couple of sequences (one in her US apartment and another in her Hong Kong apartment) where the girl stands for her dignity and her values, even at the prospect of her dreams and her love being shattered, were V…

Book Review - The Fault in Our Stars

'The Fault in Our Stars' is the first John Green book I read. And I am now going to read ALL his books. This book was a revelation. Because, when I picked up the book, I had braced myself for yet another global phenomenon, immensely popular romance now-made-into-a-Hollywood-blockbuster (soon to be re-made in India, I hear), but essentially 'Sympathy Lit' (which I am told is now almost a guaranteed recipe for success in that genre). And I was SO WRONG! Yes, there are diseases, there is misery, there are moments when I choked up, but Green takes this completely irreverent tone,his characters crack genuinely funny jokes about themselves and their physical challenges, and in general, they have fun! More than a love story with, well an inevitable tragic ending, this is a story of hope, and this is about how life should be lived to the fullest. As I read through the funny vivacious escapades of the couple, one with cancer affecting her lungs, and the other having lost a leg…

Kolkata: The anatomy of a city in Agni Mitra thrillers

The first Agni Mitra thriller ‘In the Shadows of Death’ (https://goo.gl/ajgKLn) starts with a portrayal of Park Street on a rainy evening, which goes as below: 

“Those who had run for cover under the shades included men and women who had been working late in the many offices in the neighbourhood, street children who would otherwise flock around foreigners staying in one of the plush hotels in the area, pimps who carried albums loaded with pictures of call-girls and would get in the way of men roaming around alone in Park Street, and hookers who roamed the streets or waited patiently for hours on end in desolate corners of the roads or in the bus stops in their loud make-up and hopeful eyes, waiting to be picked up and driven to cheap hotels around the place. The incongruous mix of people who stood next to each other, skin to skin, in the bus stops or under the ledges of the showrooms of global brands that lined the road, made Agni smile to himself every time he crossed them. That one s…

Chinese food, Romance and a Murder: What’s cooking?

‘The Colours of Passion’ brings to light the fate of a number of our favourite stand-alone restaurants in the face of competition from global restaurant chains.
China Valley, one of the oldest restaurants in South Kolkata, started off back in the seventies and soon became one of the most popular eateries in town. Taking a girl to China Valley for dinner could win her suitor brownie points and give him a head start in the field!
China Valley kept growing through the eighties and nineties, launching new properties and takeaway counters in different parts of Kolkata. In the early years of the millennium, the owners even planned expansion beyond Kolkata.
And then, a few years back, the slump kicked in.
“The city suddenly had several new options. Global chains started making inroads. People started experimenting with different kinds of cuisines. Kolkata became more cosmopolitan, which had an influence on the city’s culinary habits. Shopping malls started flourishing. Dining got linked with a…