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What does the Indian media have to say about In the Shadows of Death

Go Air in-flight magazine
Absolute India Tabloid
The Free Press Journal
The Indian Express
The Hindustan Times
The Hindu - 2
The Hindu (1)

In the Shadows of Death completes 5 months and I thought it would be worthwhile to summarize the media mentions for my work.

I can't thank enough the respected reviewers who have been insightful, looking beyond the obvious elements of thrill and suspense and commenting on the dynamics of human relationships in contemporary urban India that I made humble efforts to portray through my work.

The media response has been truly inspirational, and I hope as I chase my dreams, you will be with me in my journey, motivating me, inspiring me, and helping me with your feedback so that I can further hone my craft. 

The Times of India: Set in the city of Kolkata, "In The Shadows of Death: A Detective Agni Mitra Thriller" is a fast paced potboiler which hooks you and keeps you glued to the plot from the very beginning.

The Hindu (1): With an almost Freudian understanding of how our childhood experiences influence our adult decisions, Sourabh’s novel paints a stark picture of urban life in India

The Hindu (2): When you turn the last page of the book, the theatrical finale comes as much from the extraordinary storytelling as it does from the reveal of the murderer. In clean, clear prose, Saurabh Mukherjee’s debut novel traverses the underbelly and upmarket suburbs of Kolkata… Mukherjee has the unerring eye of a master craftsman.

Business Standard: Just when you think you've got it all figured out as per the clues that the killer leaves like crumbs, the author throws you off the path repeatedly with the twists. A heady concoction of thrill, mystery, psychology and humanity is what makes this book such an engrossing fare.

The New Indian Express: A whodunit with several twists, In the Shadows of Death written by Sourabh Mukherjee has elements of romance, corporate scandals, and suspense with a strong emotional undercurrent.

Punjab Tribune: A heady concoction of thrill, mystery, psychology and humanity is what makes this book such an engrossing fare.

Yahoo News: Crisp, well-composed and in a good flow, there are no loose ends to irk your mind.

Zee News: Overall, the book is a page turner till the end with its fluid narrative infused with twists and revelations, which constantly raise your curiosity level. Several flashbacks in the book also keeps a reader's interest level high.

The Free Press Journal: A psychological thriller in the true sense of the phrase, In the Shadows of Death delves deep into the psyche of its characters.

Absolute India tabloid: It is not only the adrenaline rush that ignites curiosity, but also a good storyline with a meaningful plot, and of course flawless writing that does the trick.

Tahlka News: The character of detective Agni Mitra has been rendered in a very believable and realistic fashion. The author has rummaged into the human psyche and used it as the basis for the detective's theories.

World News Network: Mukherjee has explored the materialistic, urban life, its turmoils and fragility of relationships.

Go-Getter, Go Air in-flight magazine: The novel explores the city of Kolkata in a way few contemporary novels have attempted. The City of Joy is not just a backdrop but another character in the novel.


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