Skip to main content

What does the Indian media have to say about In the Shadows of Death

Go Air in-flight magazine
Absolute India Tabloid
The Free Press Journal
The Indian Express
The Hindustan Times
The Hindu - 2
The Hindu (1)

In the Shadows of Death completes 5 months and I thought it would be worthwhile to summarize the media mentions for my work.

I can't thank enough the respected reviewers who have been insightful, looking beyond the obvious elements of thrill and suspense and commenting on the dynamics of human relationships in contemporary urban India that I made humble efforts to portray through my work.

The media response has been truly inspirational, and I hope as I chase my dreams, you will be with me in my journey, motivating me, inspiring me, and helping me with your feedback so that I can further hone my craft. 

The Times of India: Set in the city of Kolkata, "In The Shadows of Death: A Detective Agni Mitra Thriller" is a fast paced potboiler which hooks you and keeps you glued to the plot from the very beginning.

The Hindu (1): With an almost Freudian understanding of how our childhood experiences influence our adult decisions, Sourabh’s novel paints a stark picture of urban life in India

The Hindu (2): When you turn the last page of the book, the theatrical finale comes as much from the extraordinary storytelling as it does from the reveal of the murderer. In clean, clear prose, Saurabh Mukherjee’s debut novel traverses the underbelly and upmarket suburbs of Kolkata… Mukherjee has the unerring eye of a master craftsman.

Business Standard: Just when you think you've got it all figured out as per the clues that the killer leaves like crumbs, the author throws you off the path repeatedly with the twists. A heady concoction of thrill, mystery, psychology and humanity is what makes this book such an engrossing fare.

The New Indian Express: A whodunit with several twists, In the Shadows of Death written by Sourabh Mukherjee has elements of romance, corporate scandals, and suspense with a strong emotional undercurrent.

Punjab Tribune: A heady concoction of thrill, mystery, psychology and humanity is what makes this book such an engrossing fare.

Yahoo News: Crisp, well-composed and in a good flow, there are no loose ends to irk your mind.

Zee News: Overall, the book is a page turner till the end with its fluid narrative infused with twists and revelations, which constantly raise your curiosity level. Several flashbacks in the book also keeps a reader's interest level high.

The Free Press Journal: A psychological thriller in the true sense of the phrase, In the Shadows of Death delves deep into the psyche of its characters.

Absolute India tabloid: It is not only the adrenaline rush that ignites curiosity, but also a good storyline with a meaningful plot, and of course flawless writing that does the trick.

Tahlka News: The character of detective Agni Mitra has been rendered in a very believable and realistic fashion. The author has rummaged into the human psyche and used it as the basis for the detective's theories.

World News Network: Mukherjee has explored the materialistic, urban life, its turmoils and fragility of relationships.

Go-Getter, Go Air in-flight magazine: The novel explores the city of Kolkata in a way few contemporary novels have attempted. The City of Joy is not just a backdrop but another character in the novel.


Comments

  1. The symbols together with the maths mannequin, special options, and sound give the machine it’s “character” and playability. If the symbols are hard to read or comparable to|similar to} each 퍼스트카지노 other, might possibly} create confusion for the player and have them move on to a different machine they get pleasure from. Paylines are predefined traces which symbols in on the reels can land after a spin. When matching combos land on a line it creates a profitable mixture.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Book Review - Poems by Subhadip Mukherjee

Ernest Hemingway said, “There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed.” Reading the poetry of Subhadip Mukherjee in his book ‘ ছেঁড়া চিন্তার Scribbles’ (Offtrack Publishers, co-authored by Dr. Kausik Ghosh), I am convinced that he is bleeding. And that’s good news. Subhadip is a nagorik kobiyal. His poems hold mirror to the stifling urban life with its rat race, with its mindless pursuit of  materialistic ambitions, and with its consumerism. নাগরিক ব্যস্ততা নানা জটিলতা... দাশু বারবার কিস্তিমাত He mocks the same judgemental urban society right in his introduction when he says: যদি তাকে চিনে থাকো যদি তাকে জেনে থাকো Boss, বেশী . মিশোনা তার সাথে সামান্য নেশা হবে ... তুমিও " খারাপ " হবে দেরি হবে রোজ রাত্তিরে Subhadip’s poems paint love in its myriad hues – from extreme euphoria to brooding despondency. Subhadip depicts the unadulterated purity of love when he says: তুই ক্লাস নাইনৈর খাতার

The Sinners: Extract #1

  Aarti was with Vikram in her one-bedroom flat. It had been raining for quite some time - the dirt washed away, street lights reflected on the wet roads. There were distant rumbles in the evening sky, sounding almost ominous. Very few cars sped down the empty road below. The room was half-lit by a single lamp on the study desk.   It was just the two of them inside the flat. They had returned a while back after dining at the Marriott in Juhu.   “I’ve been missing you for days, Vikram! I don’t remember when we met last,” Aarti’s voice rose a couple of notches, the resentment in her tone pronounced. “And when we met today after weeks, we ended up fighting.”   There were beads of sweat on Aarti’s temples and above her lips. She was visibly tense. There was a bad taste in her mouth, not the kind you carry home after a dinner at the Marriott. Vikram tried to pull her closer but Aarti freed herself and walked away towards the desk. She looked away, trying to hide the tears that were th

Decoding Marriage - An excerpt from 'An Autumn Turmoil'

  Most of us have a glorified idea about love. I think it comes from the staple diet of Bollywood movies we are all brought up on. Couples strolling on the beach, watching the sunset together, whispering promises of eternity into each other’s ear, and making love on satin sheets in wooden cottages overlooking the Swiss Alps. But life does not play out like this. The movies do not show the truth, what happens backstage. The love fades. The promises lose meaning. And the lovemaking goes from being a passion to a duty, something a married couple ‘is supposed to do at bed time.’ Before long, you reach that stage, where you can count the number of times you do it every month on your fingers, with a couple of fingers to spare. And you surrender to the monotony. The husband and the wife start living separate lives under the same roof – all in the name of security, comfort, marital bliss and sometimes, the fear of what ‘everyone would say’. Abhishek and I are fast approaching that stage in our