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Book Review - Breach by Amrita Chowdhury

In my day job, I see my clients, mostly global pharmaceutical majors, call out data security as one of the key drivers for their enterprise information management programs. The topic is more relevant now than ever with clinical trials being conducted across the globe, with varying degrees of data security controls. Trials need to be fast in the face of competition, and blockbuster drugs are short-lived in the face of challenges posed by generics. 

The premise of Breach is something I could instantly relate to. And then what I loved about the book was the way Chowdhury weaves a brilliantly executed conspiracy around what could have easily degenerated into a dry discourse on cyber crime and pharmaceutical procedures. The narrative is fast paced, the language lucid, the characters human.

In the garb of a cyber thriller, Breach is also an emotional story. I lived those few days with the protagonist of the story as he battled the crisis at work with his relationships bearing the brunt. Chowdhury beautifully portrays how relationships are put to test under difficult circumstances, and we get to know ourselves best when we are out there - all alone, with storms brewing all around us. 

I did not see the twist at the end coming. And when the 'villain' of the piece and the emotionally charged motive were revealed, it all made so much sense to me. 

Last but not the least, it was interesting to note the transformation of Madhu from a tentative small town girl to the confident, 'almost tech-savvy' metro girl. Well, maybe, we will see the complete transformation in a sequel?

Give this one a read!

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