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Book Review - Temple of Illusions by Tilottama Pal

Tilottama pens 53 poems on Love - the myriad forms of it, the myriad emotions one associates with it. With her compelling and refreshingly unique style, Tilottama weaves a tapestry of images that linger in our minds long after the last page of the book has been turned.
The book is bound to take you on a roller-coaster ride of emotions, bringing back memories of days gone by and opening up wounds you thought had healed, the very next moment enticing you with promises of a future adorned by dreams and desires you never knew existed, buried somewhere deep inside, holding a mirror to your present all the while.
Sample this - while the book opens with poems like 'Waves' and 'Destination' that tug at your heart-strings with visuals of separation, the very next poem is about gay, unbridled abandon!
'For Me', 'Eyes', 'Tramstop', 'Apparition', 'Romance', 'Return', 'Incomplete' are some of my favourite love poems. Tilottama skillfully depicts the agony and the ecstasy of love - the longing, the wait, and the hopes we hold on to - and of stories left incomplete.
Her poems can be everything from fun ('Romance', 'Voyeur') to extremely passionate ('Poison'), from harshly real ('Entrapment') to philosophical ('Silence') and spiritual ('Pilgrimage').
I often end up remembering a book days after I have read one, by the memories it evokes. And here is one book that will always bring back to my mind a kaleidoscope of colours, of emotions, of hidden tears, of boisterous laughters, and of Incomplete Mistakes (Tilottama, I loved that phrase!)
Keep writing my sister and I want to see you soar.

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