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Book Review - The Sinister Silence by Moitrayee Bhaduri

I finished reading Moitrayee Bhaduri's 'The Sinister Silence' (http://www.amazon.in/Sinister-Silence-Moitrayee/…/9382665552) last night.
Sharing your thoughts about a thriller is always difficult as you run the risk of giving away too much. So I will be economical and cautious with my words.
Moitrayee, firstly, I love the story you tell in this book. Every time I read a thriller, I look for the story at the core when the obvious elements of tension, suspense and adrenaline rush have been stripped off. And this book scores big time there.
There are intriguing subplots that kept me guessing all through. Moitrayee brilliantly portrays the complexity of relationships, the politics and the vested interests we all encounter at work and at home everyday.
Moitrayee has an eye for details and while there are a number of characters in this intriguing play, she develops them through their actions and dialogues and sometimes sketches their character graphs with crisp backstories. I also loved the way she cobbles up the intricate sequence of events of the night of the murders.
And finally, as the chain-smoking, apple-gorging, ex-encounter specialist supercop, Mili Ray kicks butt - literally. Here is a lady sleuth Indian English fiction badly needed.

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